How Many Hours Must One Study the Evidence for the Resurrection to Reject This Claim? Answer: Not One Second

The Resurrection of the Dead ⋆

Fact: Science has never confirmed one single event which has defied the laws of physics. Therefore, as an educated person living in the twenty-first century, I can ignore all claims which defy the laws of physics.

It is true that the fact that science has never confirmed a single laws-of-physics defying event does not prove that these events have never occurred. But the probability that these events have occurred, and science has missed them, is so low I do not need to bother considering them.

–In the tens of thousands of years of human existence, human virgins have never given birth to babies without the participation of a human male. Never.

–In the tens of thousands of years of human existence, brain dead human corpses never come back to life. Never.

So when someone claims that ONE time in human history, thousands of years ago, these two events which never happen happened, I can discount and ignore these claims without spending five seconds investigating the alleged evidence for these claims.

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Can One Dismiss a World Religion’s Supernatural Claims Without In-Depth Knowledge of Those Claims? Yep!

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“I contend we are both atheists, I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours.”

—Stephen F Roberts

Randal Rauser, sophisticated (he has a PhD) Christian apologist:

[T]here is a glaring problem here: Roberts himself has clearly not carefully canvassed the thought-worlds, communal praxis, and evidential basis of the countless world religions. If he had, he would never have said anything as inane as “When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours.” The fact is that distinct adherents to different religions all have distinct levels of intelligence and knowledge about their religious perspective and the supporting evidence for it, a distinct range of experiences and intuitions, and a distinct range of exposure to alternative views.

The real problem, of course, is that Roberts engages in a little game of self-deception by limiting the field of players to those who espouse specific “religions” by some particular socially constructed definition of “religion”. In fact, the real issue is not about religions per se but rather about worldviews, and the epistemic humility to recognize that one’s dismissal of worldviews other than one’s own is always limited by one’s own epistemic horizons. And in the case of Roberts, those horizons are limited indeed.

Gary:

What the esteemed Dr. Rauser is really saying is that because Mr. Roberts has not done an in-depth study of every worldview on the planet, he has no grounds for dismissing anyone else’s worldview. Is that realistic?? Is that rational??

I don’t think so.

I don’t need to do an in-depth study of tarot card readers and psychics to dismiss their claims with not a second’s consideration. I just have to use my university educated brain and critical thinking skills to dismiss their claims as superstitious, ignorant nonsense.

I don’t need to do an in-depth study of Mormonism to dismiss, with not a second’s consideration, the claim that a guy in the nineteenth century named Joseph received a message on golden plates from a celestial being named Moroni. I just have to use my university educated brain and critical thinking skills to dismiss this claim as superstitious, ignorant nonsense.

I don’t need to do an in-depth study of Islam to dismiss, with not a second’s consideration, the claim that a guy in the seventh century named Mohammad received a message from a celestial being named Gabriel and later rode a winged horse into outer space (heaven). I just have to use my university educated brain and critical thinking skills to dismiss this claim as superstitious, ignorant nonsense.

And lastly, I don’t need to do an in-depth study of Christianity to dismiss, with not a second’s consideration, claims that include: a first century virgin being impregnated without the assistance of a male human; a man who can walk on water, turn water into wine; heal the blind; raise the dead; raise himself from the dead; and finally, levitate from the top of a mountain into outer space. I just have to use my university educated brain and critical thinking skills to dismiss this claim, too, as superstitious, ignorant nonsense.

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No, You Don’t Need a PhD in Biblical Studies to Deconvert from Christianity

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Christian Apologist: Gary, you left Christianity because you were poorly educated in the Faith and because you think like a fundamentalist. If you had invested the time to properly educate yourself, reading quality books by the many highly educated Christian scholars and theologians, you would see and comprehend the profound intricacies and complexities of the Christian Scriptures. You would see very clearly that Christianity is true. You would not have deconverted. (You are ignorant and stupid!)

Gary: How funny. That is exactly what Muslim and Mormon apologists say to their “apostates”! Check it out:

And here is a short clip of an ex-Mormon describing similar attacks by Mormons:

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When Jesus Said, “Ask Anything and I Will Do It”, He Didn’t Mean Anything

If ye shall ask anything in my name, I... - Benny Hinn Ministries | Facebook

I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven.  —Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 18.19).

And whatever you ask in prayer, you will receive, if you have faith.  –Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 21.22).

Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. –Jesus of Nazareth (Mark 11.24).

Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. –Jesus of Nazareth (John 14.13).

I say to you, whatever you ask from the Father, He will give it to you in My name. –Jesus of Nazareth (John 16.23).

Christian: [In regards to the above passages] 1) Did Jesus really say it? 2) Is there a standing qualifier someplace you are not looking at?

in John 16 he says: (John 16:1-4) The reason for Jesus’ warning: certain persecution.

“These things I have spoken to you, that you should not be made to stumble. They will put you out of the synagogues; yes, the time is coming that whoever kills you will think that he offers God service. And these things they will do to you because they have not known the Father nor Me. But these things I have told you, that when the time comes, you may remember that I told you of them. And these things I did not say to you at the beginning, because I was with you.”

That is not consistent with saying ask anything and it will be done. Turns out that passage is not spoken to all believers but specifically to the Apostles about Jesus leaving. The thing about God will give them what they ask applies to the end time and perhaps to the millennial kingdom.

verse 22 “So with you: Now is your time of grief, but I will see you again and you will rejoice, and no one will take away your joy. 23 In that day you will no longer ask me anything. Very truly I tell you, my Father will give you whatever you ask in my name.”

Any time you throw out a bunch of verses without exegesis you over simplifying, We have to assume Jesus didn’t mean stuff like: Ok God, I ask for a million dollars to appear before me!

Gary: Jesus is (allegedly) quoted, by multiple Gospel authors, stating that if a believer asks for ANYTHING/WHATSOEVER in his name, he will do it. I realize that Christians have many different “harmonizations” (exegesis) to explain why Jesus didn’t mean to say what he clearly said, but to any neutral observer, that is BS.

It would be more credible to claim that Jesus never made these statements (what sane human being would?); that these statements were legendary; or were inventions of the Evangelists. But if we cannot trust the Gospel authors to correctly record very simple statements as these, why should we trust any statements in their work?

We have to assume Jesus didn’t mean stuff like, “Ok God, I ask for a million dollars to appear before me!”

Maybe. If we assume that Jesus didn’t really mean “anything” or “whatsoever” but meant “some things, when it is my will” that might be true. But why then say “anything” without qualifying it? That seems like something a snake oil salesman would do, not a perfect, just and loving god.

And what about the millions of devout Christians who request healing for themselves or others, and the healing never occurs? What is the excuse for Jesus not answering these prayers? “Not his will?” BS! And if “anything” is limited to something that is not greedy or selfish, praying that the starving children in Africa get some food seems to meet that criteria. But yet, 17,000 children under the age of five, each and every day, die of starvation. Why doesn’t Jesus answer these prayers???

I think there are only three options to explain these passages: Jesus was either misquoted, delusional, or lying.

And if Jesus was misquoted, our Bibles are not worth the paper they are printed on, except as fascinating examples of first century superstitious literature. They can in no way be trusted as historically reliable biographies in regards to the life, words, and deeds of Jesus of Nazareth.

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Unanswered Prayer is Evidence of Jesus Christ’s Non-Existence

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One does not need to debate the evidence for the alleged Resurrection to know with certainty that Jesus of Nazareth was not a god, and certainly not the creator god of the universe. This god/man (allegedly) made the following statements which any six year old can see are clear statements that if a believer asks for ANYTHING, in faith, it will be done.

I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. (Matthew 18.19).

And whatever you ask in prayer, you will receive, if you have faith. (Matthew 21.22).

Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. (Mark 11.24).

Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. (John 14.13).

I say to you, whatever you ask from the Father, He will give it to you in My name. (John 16.23).

Jesus was wrong. Jesus was not a god. Jesus does not merit your worship and praise. He is dead. Let the man rest in peace.

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Dear Christians: Please Admit that Answered Prayer is Not Good Evidence for the Existence of Your God

Does God exist? | GotQuestions.org

Christian: I think you are missing a couple of crucial points. Prayer is based on the will of another. It is a request and if the one being entreated does not wish to answer then he won’t. So the hit rate for prayer can’t be taken as proof or disproof. Prayer is not primarily about asking for things. It’s effect cannot be judged by that criteria. Prayer is hanging out with God.

Gary: So you would then agree that answered prayer is not good evidence for your god’s existence.

Edexcel Believing in God Revision
In other words: Whatever happens, God did it. Why not just accept that events occur by chance?

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Prayer is a Slot Machine

How Does a Slot Machine Work? - Pissed Off Geek

Christian: You assert prayer doesn’t work but that depends upon what you expect from it. It’s not an automatic machine that works every time. Your assertions are groundless. God is real and he can’t lose.

Gary: You are correct. Prayer is not an automatic machine. Prayer is a slot machine. You “win” just often enough to keep you pulling the handle. And that is why human beings have been praying to gods for thousands upon thousands of years. Prayers to Zeus, Ra, and Jupiter were “answered” just often enough to keep the masses praying to them (and obeying/giving money to their priests).

The truth is, I cannot prove that prayer does not work and you cannot prove that it does.

God is real and he cant lose.

Which god? Jesus of Nazareth?? 2,000 year old, contested, alleged, eyewitness testimony of ghost sightings is NOT good evidence that a first century peasant is the creator of the universe. But as we both know, your belief (like that of most Christians) in this ancient tale is primarily based on your intense emotions; intense emotions perpetuated daily when you perceive that you communicate with this invisible person with magical powers.

Listen carefully: Dead people stay dead. Invisible people are not real. You are operating under a very comforting, very pleasant, but very false delusion, my friend. Come into the light of reason and non-superstitious thinking.

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When I Pray, I Feel God’s Presence

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Christian: When I pray I feel God’s presence. The sense of love and security tell me it’s right and that I know God/God knows me. When I go for a long time without prayer I feel uneasy, like things are not right. I feel a sense of longing to pray again.

Gary: The problem is, many people of many different religions, cults, and sects claim to intensely “feel” the presence of their deity. How do we determine who is right?

Christian: That makes no difference. God is working in all cultures. Exclusivity is not the reason to accept Christ. There are other arguments.

Premium Photo | Muslim man praying at home

Gary: How do you know that it is a god causing all these emotional experiences and not simply misperceptions of reality? Many religious experiences seem to be tied to unusual events which the person perceives as a divine miracle. Isn’t it possible that these odd events can be explained statistically as nothing more than rare, but very natural events? If this is the case, these emotional experiences are based on misperceptions of reality, right?

Christian: The concept of God is the basis of reality itself. The nature of mystical experience contains the sense of holiness and union with God. Mystical experiences can be evoked by all kinds of things, not caused, but triggered by mundane things.

Gary: The question remains: Are feelings and perceptions involving mystical experiences reliable sources of information regarding universal truth claims? Can you provide evidence that disproves my proposition that all mystical experiences may be nothing more than misperceptions of reality (illusions or delusions)?

Prayer to hindu god Stock Photos - Page 1 : Masterfile

Christian: Dr. [Ralph W.] Hood made the argument and it is backed by the M scale that we should expect a naturalistic psychological process to differ in experiences since religious symbols are culturally based, but the experiences are the same, meaning they experienced the same reality.

Gary: Reality? How do you know it is reality and not misperception? You don’t. In the ancient past, and still today in primitive cultures, the most mundane of events was/is seen as an act of a god, whether it be thunder, lightning, drought, or even just the the rustling of the wind through the trees.

Based on collective human experience, mystical experiences are most likely nothing more than superstitions—misinterpretations of reality—unless you can provide better evidence.

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Would God Send Humans a Message of Salvation that Only Theologians and Scholars Can Decipher?

The Bible by Various Authors. Well, we are a Christian community. | Holy  bible, Bible pictures, Bible

My deconversion from Christianity did not happen overnight. It was a painful, four month process. I started out a fundamentalist, believing that every statement in the Bible was a literal fact, unless the language of the passage clearly indicated it was allegorical. So, I believed that Jonah literally lived in the belly of a fish for three days. I believed that dead saints were literally shaken back to life by an earthquake on Easter morning. When the Bible states that God will preserve his Word, and that he would not allow one jot or tittle to be changed, I believed that literally.

But one fateful day in 2014, I attempted to “reconvert” a Baptist pastor turned atheist blogger who was saying all kinds of horrific blasphemy against my Lord and Savior. In our discussions, he presented information that shocked me: Our Bibles contain thousands of scribal alterations of the originals. I was horrified. God said he would never allow his Word to be altered, but there they are, the Johannine Commae being the most grievous.

I sought reassurance from pastors, of several different denominations. They tried to assure me that these alterations were irrelevant. “It isn’t every word that matters, it is the overall MESSAGE that matters. The MESSAGE is inerrant, not every word.”

So God didn’t mean “every jot and tittle” he meant “the overall message”.

Ok… I’ll go with that…I think.

But then I started looking at the “message”. Was eternal damnation in Hell part of the message or a part of the “jot and tittle” that could be ignored? After all, there is substantial evidence that the concept of an afterlife did not exist until after the Jewish exile in Babylon. What about the Story of the Exodus? Most archaeologists no longer believe that this story is historical. The archaeological evidence for this story does not exist. Yet Jesus seemed to have believed that it was a real event. Jesus also seemed to have believed that Noah was a real person and that the Great Flood was a real event. Was Jesus wrong? I was again assured that since Jesus is perfect and can never be wrong, that Jesus was accommodating to his first century culture who *did* believe these persons and events were real. “The Bible cannot be read literally. One must understand the literary genre and cultural nuances to understand the intended meaning of the author.” So…the common man cannot understand the Bible? Only theologians and scholars can know what God really meant to convey in his message to the human race?

The pastors and online Christian apologists and bloggers to whom I reached out to in my desperate attempt to save my faith, always had a harmonization or resolution for every alleged contradiction or discrepancy in the Bible. But just because one can reconcile every apparent contradiction in an ancient text, does that mean that the text is historically reliable?

I finally had to ask myself this question: Would a good, loving, just, perfect, all-knowing God send humankind a message of salvation that is clear and concise, or would he send us a message that is so complicated to decipher, so full of allegory and “accommodation”, that many millions of people would reject the message as human-made nonsense? Would God send a message of salvation that only someone with a degree in theology could understand??

I don’t think so.

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