I Know the Resurrection Happened Because Jesus Lives in My Heart

I was discussing the lack of evidence for the dating of Jesus’ birth, death, and alleged resurrection with a Christian relative last night. After I reviewed all the evidence (or lack thereof) my relative said matter-of-factly:

“I don’t care. I know that Jesus was resurrected because he lives in my heart.”

And there you go. That is why discussing historical evidence with Christians is a waste of time.

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End of post.

9 thoughts on “I Know the Resurrection Happened Because Jesus Lives in My Heart

  1. Ultimately this principle underlies every apologetic, and every castle in the sky theological system.
    And naturally Christians and pretty much all religions have a parallel (?) view towards non believers- that ultimately it’s not about evidence and reason, it’s ultimately about pride and hatred of the God’s (which ever religion happens to be making the claim) holiness. Which then begs the question of why bother with apologetics. I tell ya, it all points to Calvinism!

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  2. After presenting overwhelming evidence to my Christian family member that demonstrates that the evidence for the supernatural claims of Christianity is very weak and full of baseless assumptions, my family member said: “I don’t care. I know Jesus was resurrected because he lives in my heart. And he has lived in my heart since I was a small child.”

    How do you counter that? So the real question to ask Christians (instead of asking them for historical evidence for their beliefs), is to ask: How old were you when you first believed in the resurrected Jesus as your Lord and Savior?

    Most mainline Protestants and Catholics will state that they have always believed in Jesus as their Savior, ever since they were born (their baptism). Most evangelicals will state that they were “saved” at a very early age, often between five and eight years old, according to studies.

    So if you have believed in virgin births and resurrected corpses since the age of five, and your entire social network (parents, extended family, pastors, church friends, etc.) reinforce your childhood belief in virgin births and resurrected corpses, AND, you are an evangelical who believes that you can perceive the presence of this man-god in your “heart”—answering your wish requests, protecting you from harm, and performing “miracles” for you ever since you were a small child—NO amount of historical evidence is going to change your mind.

    These poor people are deeply delusional. Shoving historical evidence under their noses is not going to work. So how do we help these people to escape from their fear-based delusion (a delusion that tells them that if they leave and abandon the belief system they will be eternally damned)? Is it even possible?

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  3. In the big picture, the vast majority of cases, I don’t think it’s probable. But yet, the fact that many of us here and on other skeptic blogs are ex christians, means it’s possible.

    But it’s rare and for most is a long process. A discussion or two at a dinner table will rarely yield any results. One has to balance the likely change of alienating friends and family with slim chance of changing their mind way down the road. Because it’s not just about fact A countering belief B, it’s about a whole ecosystem of belonging and relationships and one’s place in the world. For many even the thought of questioning that makes them nauseous. There is no real motivation because, frankly, if they are wrong, they would not want to know it, as it would turn their life and relationships upside down.

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  4. Peter Williams and Ehrman debated on The Big Conversation and Ehrman pointed out that no true believer could genuinely approach this question historically as their arguments were always undermined by their theology.

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    1. That’s a good point and demonstrates how people like Licona, Mcdowell, Habermas, et al. who claim to have examined their faith from a doubting perspective are not able to look at the historical evidence objectively.

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  5. Belief in the bodily resurrection of Jesus defies good critical thinking skills and common sense.

    If God the Creator came to earth in human form, performed numerous fantastical miracles including raising people from the dead; was publicly tried, convicted, and executed by a governor of the Roman Empire; but three days later, rose from the dead and appeared in “heavenly form” to multiple groups of eyewitnesses, including one crowd of over 500 people, SOMEONE would have recorded the dates of these events. But no one did. These stories are legends, folks. If these extraordinary, fantastical, but undated claims were made by any other religion you would laugh and not give it another second of your time. Jesus may have existed, but the fantastical tales about him are clearly legends. Period.

    Gary, I Doubt You Could Go Toe to Toe With A Knowledgeable Christian Apologist

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