Millions of Educated People Believe in the Resurrection. Does that Make it a Rational Belief?

Figuring out the Educated Individual - Education Activitie

Christian apologists are often incensed when we skeptic counter-apologists label Christian supernatural claims irrational.

“Tens of thousands of very intelligent, highly educated, attorneys, doctors, engineers and other Christian professionals believe in the historicity of the bodily resurrection of Jesus. This proves that belief in the Resurrection is rational.”

Really?

Tens of thousands of very intelligent, highly educated, attorneys, doctors, engineers and other Muslim professionals believe in the historicity of Mohammad’s flight on a winged horse to heaven. Does the fact that a lot of educated people believe this supernatural claim prove that belief in flying horses is rational?

I will bet you will say, no.

Tens of thousands of very intelligent, highly educated, attorneys, doctors, engineers and other Buddhist professionals believe in the historicity of the Buddha’s miracle in which he caused a water buffalo to speak in a human language. Does the fact that a lot of educated people believe this supernatural claim prove that belief in talking animals is rational?

I will bet you will say, no.

So you see, dear Christian apologist, just because a lot of people believe a particular supernatural claim in no way makes that belief rational. Most educated, non-Christian people in the world believe that your belief in virgin births and resurrected corpses is just as irrational as their supernatural beliefs are to you. Face the facts: all supernatural beliefs are superstitions and superstitions are not rational.

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End of post.

6 thoughts on “Millions of Educated People Believe in the Resurrection. Does that Make it a Rational Belief?

  1. The whole point of “belief” … “believing in” … is because one has no proof whatsoever. When there is definitive proof, there is no reason for belief. People don’t “believe in” rocks, for example.

    People, whether they are educated or not, enjoy their fairy tales. The enjoy the rituals & the celebrations connected to these fairy tales. There’s nothing wrong with this; life is tough & people need these things. The problem is when they insist that everyone enjoy the same fairy tale they enjoy. Or that they enjoy them at all. Or believe. Some of us have no belief … we just like the celebration.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Christians are never satisfied with the number of books a skeptic has read. A Christian reader of Joel Anderson’s blog said this about the long list of books I have read regarding Christianity (see my about page):

    You’ve got some impressive titles listed, esp. Bauckham, Brown, Evans, Luedemann,and Wright.

    But there are lots more authors out there.

    Here are a few authors to check out:

    Michael Bird

    Craig Blomberg

    Darrell Bock

    Paul Rhodes Eddy and Gregory A.. Boyd

    Simon Gathercole

    Mark Goodacre

    Scott McKnight

    John Meier

    Nicolas Perrin

    Brant J. Pitre

    EP Sanders

    Chris Tilling

    Ben Witherington III

    And you really need to read all of Wright’s “Christian Origins and the Question of God” series.

    Pax.

    Gary: How many books about Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism or any other world religion would this Christian read before deciding that he had read enough to discount the supernatural claims of all these other religions? One? None??

    Christian apologists will never be satisfied with the number of Christian books a skeptic reads until the skeptic converts to Christianity!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. People all over the world, of all backgrounds and professions, believe superstitious nonsense. That there are well educated people who also share that superstition doesn’t make it any less of a superstition. Indoctrinated, and culturally reinforced, beliefs are difficult to shake especially when the consequences can also mean being virtually ostracized from your community.

    Like

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