My Suggested Addition to an Evangelical Apologist’s Upcoming Book: Having a Personal Relationship with a Dead Guy

Do you call Jesus your friend? Count me in! – Fearless Living

If you have been reading this blog for the last few weeks you know that I have been leaving comments and interacting with Christian believers on the website of evangelical theologian and apologist, Randall Rauser. He has an upcoming book release. He is asking for suggestions for the cover of his book, but I have a suggestion for an additional chapter. See my comment below.

Help to Build Up a Personal Relationship with Jesus Christ

Randall Rauser: I need your help! My next book consists of 25 short chapters and I made a survey in which I ask you to choose the top 5 choices to be included on the back cover of the book. Check it out

here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NKVKN2N

Gary: Done (I completed the survey on Surveymonkey). I will definitely buy and read the book. However, I would add one additional chapter:

Does my belief that I have a personal relationship with the resurrected Jesus make it impossible for me to objectively evaluate the historical evidence for his alleged resurrection?

A 'personal relationship with Jesus Christ'

.

Have a Personal Relationship With Jesus Christ You Have a ...

.

.

.

.

End of post.

3 thoughts on “My Suggested Addition to an Evangelical Apologist’s Upcoming Book: Having a Personal Relationship with a Dead Guy

  1. “Does my belief that I have a personal relationship with the resurrected Jesus make it impossible for me to objectively evaluate the historical evidence for his alleged resurrection?”

    Interesting question.

    Does my belief that I have a personal relationship – over the internet – with someone in Ecuador make it impossible for me to objectively evaluate the historical evidence for her birth, or place of residence, or profession?

    The answer to both questions above: No.

    Like

  2. I disagree.

    The issue is not whether a “relationship with a resurrected person” can exist.

    Such a relationship can not, of course, exist unless the person (Jesus, in this case) was truly resurrected in the first place. If Jesus was truly resurrected, then one must allow for (at least) a possibility of having a “relationship” with the resurrected Jesus.

    (NOTE: I myself don’t use such terminology. I think it’s metaphoric, and somewhat misleading – so, I’m not defending anything about what such a “relationship” would entail).

    In any case, if Jesus was truly resurrected, then, I do not know of any necessary prohibitions to having some type of “relationship” with the resurrected Jesus (and – it must be said – one must define or explain what is meant by “relationship” – it’s a vague term).

    But, the question – the first question – is whether Jesus was truly resurrected or not.

    That “resurrection” would have been an event in “time and space”, no different than any other such event, and as such, is subject to various methods of inquiry to determine whether it happened or not.

    Can a person “believe” they have a “relationship” with a resurrected Jesus, and then decide to objectively investigate whether the event of the resurrection even occurred or not?

    Of course they can. And many have. There are many Christians (and ex-Christians) that decided to take a more objective, investigative approach to whether the resurrection happened or not. And, based on their own interpretation of the available info, some have determined that it is more plausible that a resurrection did not occur, and some have determined that it is more plausible that it did occur.

    But the mere fact that there are, and have been “proclaimed Christians” that, because of doubts, decided to look into the resurrection in a more “objectively historical” fashion – and regardless of their conclusions – it is absolute proof that a professing Christian can indeed look into the matter of the resurrection in an objective fashion.

    But it would be a big mistake to think that a person, being “objective” in regards to their inquiry of whether Jesus was really resurrected or not, would by any necessity conclude that the resurrection didn’t happen.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s