Review of “The Case Against Miracles”, Part 8: Calvinist Apologist Alvin Plantinga Doubts that Non-Believers Can Be Convinced by Evidence

Image result for image of alvin plantinga
Alvin Plantiga, Calvinst Christian theologian, apologist, and philosopher

 

[T]he believer is entirely within his epistemic rights in believing,  for example, that God has created the world, even if he has no argument at all for that conclusion.  His belief in God can be perfectly rational even if he knows of no cogent argument, deductive or inductive, for the existence of God—indeed, even if there is no such argument.

Alvin Plantinga, Faith and Rationality: Reason and Belief in God, p. 65

 

I don’t know of an argument for Christian belief that seems very likely to convince one who doesn’t already accept its conclusion.  That is nothing against Christian belief, however, and indeed I shall argue that if Christian beliefs are true, then the standard and most satisfactory way to hold them will not be as the conclusions of argument.

–Alvin Plantinga, Warranted Christian Belief, p. 201

 

Plantinga says this because he believes human beings are fallen creatures.  Due to sin we cannot be convinced his god exists by arguments because fallen people cannot respond positively to his god.  Sinners, non-believers, can only be saved directly by god.  So in turn, Plantinga doesn’t think these arguments can convince reasonable outsiders, non-believers, because there are no reasonable non-believers.

But just think how Plantinga first came to his conclusion.  It didn’t come from the Bible since so many other Christians dispute the relevant passages.  The real reason he believes this is because so many people are non-Christians, non-believers.  He must account for this fact.  Surely it isn’t due to the lack of sufficient evidence that so many people don’t believe.  Oh no!  It must be due to the consequences of human sin.  It could never be due to his god or the lack of evidence.

—John Loftus, The Case Against Miracles, pp. 183, 189

 

Gary:  Calvinism has to be the greatest defense for the supernatural claims of Christianity ever invented!  When a skeptic points out the weakness in the evidence for any particular supernatural-based Christian claim, the Calvinist can simply reply:  “Christians will never be able to provide sufficient evidence to convince you to believe the claims of Christianity because you are obviously not one of the Elect.  God has not chosen you to believe.  If he had, you would immediately see the truth.  You would immediately see just how strong and convincing the evidence for Christianity really is.  You cannot see the truth because God has not elected you to see the truth.

Who can beat that argument??

The Case Against Miracles

 

 

 

 

End of post.

3 thoughts on “Review of “The Case Against Miracles”, Part 8: Calvinist Apologist Alvin Plantinga Doubts that Non-Believers Can Be Convinced by Evidence

  1. It’s important to read between the lines with a philosopher such as Plantinga and ”hear” the spill words – words that go unsaid. In other words one can convert his comments into a more vernacular turn of phrase like thus.

    ”Belief in God, which is really belief in the Christian is an a priori belief that has absolutely no basis in evidence at all. But I am sticking with my philosophical approach because deep down I know I am a sinner and need to washed in the blood of Christ or I’ll spend eternity in Hell.”

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Calvinist Apologist Alvin Plantinga Doubts that Non-Believers Can Be Convinced by Evidence.

    I’m always comically baffled by how many false presumptions Christian Apologists make about non-Christians. It is often ridiculous what apriori notions they instantly make about total strangers or new acquaintances! Do they seriously not live in this real-world and keep up with all the newest NON-Christian news, advancements, and undermining debunking evidence against their antiquated Faith? I seriously think that they spend all their waking hours completely consumed, enclosed inside an airtight Christian seminary or church bubble surrounded by no one other than echoing Christian Faith-followers! If they come out, they must wear these airtight Christian gas-masks with deafening earplugs inserted!

    Mr. Plantinga, on the contrary we have been wanting to see, hear, touch, and smell ANY AND ALL evidence that unequivocally proves the wild claims/narrations inside your 4th-century CE Canonical Koine Greek Gospels! For the last 1,960 years this has never been the case. In fact, with more and more time passing YOUR blind-faith position in your Jesus Christ’s divine resurrection, etc, etc, weakens, cracks, and falls apart completely!

    No, I’d say it is YOU Mr. Plantinga who ignores and denies the constantly accumulating evidence DISPROVING your mythical God and Savior. Step outside of your Christian bubble and LIVE! Live a real life based on facts and ever-improving science. You’ll never know how sweet it is until you do it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. “His belief in God can be perfectly rational even if he knows of no cogent argument, deductive or inductive, for the existence of God—indeed, even if there is no such argument.”

    I presume his position is because he believe that believers can have experiences which they know are coming from Jesus? But how exactly is it rational to believe in something which we otherwise have no good reason to believe exists?

    If I believed that I had an experience with a resurrected Elvis, or even aliens, I can rationally believe I had some kind of experience, because it’s completely rational to accept that we have experiences about all kinds of things. The problem is that I don’t see how one can rationally think that the best explanation for this kind of experience is actual aliens, or an actually resurrected Elvis. This takes a fundamental leap of faith that I cannot understand the warrant for.

    Until such time that we actually are able to determine that aliens really do exist, or Elvis was resurrected, what personal, private, experiences could ever justify such belief?

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