Review of “The Case Against Miracles”, Part 10a: Matthew the Evangelist, Cherry Picker Extraordinaire, Isaiah 7

A number of the prophecies Matthew identifies as fulfilled in his narrative are quoted out of context in ways that distort their original meanings.   …What happens to the meanings Matthew sees in these prophecies when we take into account the lines just before or after the ones Matthew selects for quotation?

Isaiah 7:10-16

Again the Lord spoke to Ahaz, saying, 11 Ask a sign of the Lord your God; let it be deep as Sheol or high as heaven. 12 But Ahaz said, I will not ask, and I will not put the Lord to the test. 13 Then Isaiah[d] said: “Hear then, O house of David! Is it too little for you to weary mortals, that you weary my God also? 14 Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Look, the young woman[e] is with child and shall bear a son, and shall name him Immanuel.[f] 15 He shall eat curds and honey by the time he knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good. 16 For before the child knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good, the land before whose two kings you are in dread will be deserted.

Matthew can read Jesus into Isaiah 7:14 only if he isolates it from the verses immediately before and after it.

–Robert Miller, The Case Against Miracles, pp. 260-261

The Case Against Miracles

 

 

 

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