Jesus Ignores the Prayers of 16,000 Starving Children Each and Every Day, but He Healed You. Praise Jesus!

Image result for image of manna
The Israelites collect manna that God has sent from heaven

 

Gary:  The truth is, personal testimony is the only evidence Christians have that prayer to Jesus is effective.

Christian:  Hmm…except perhaps for the online video and medical evidence of my friend’s leg being lengthened in response to prayer.

—(Gary):  “Leg lengthening” is one of the oldest parlour tricks in the book.  Check it out here

Gary:  I am a physician. Why haven’t I heard of this “miracle” leg lengthening? We medical experts are fully prepared to acknowledge amazing cures and recoveries, but there has to be good evidence to support it. Has any national (non-religious) medical society in your country investigated this claim and acknowledged that sufficient evidence exists to substantiate the claim that a leg has extended its length? If so, please give a link.

I’ve read both volumes of pentecostal Christian theologian Craig Keener’s “Miracles”. His book seems to be the “Bible” for many Christians regarding miracles. In it are thousands of similar “miracle” claims. Yet Keener admits he spent not one penny on researching the claims. What may seem like a miracle to you and other non-medical people, may well have an underlying, natural explanation.

Think about this:  Each and every day 16,000 children die of starvation. The God who allegedly rained-down bread (manna) from heaven, does not lift a finger to throw these children even a few crumbs of bread to keep them alive. Yet…he hears and answers the prayer of your friend to lengthen his leg a few millimeters.  Either your God works in mysterious, capricious, brutally cold-hearted ways, or, your friend’s alleged leg lengthening has a natural explanation. Which is more likely??

 

 

 

 

End of post.

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34 thoughts on “Jesus Ignores the Prayers of 16,000 Starving Children Each and Every Day, but He Healed You. Praise Jesus!

  1. His leg is longer because someone’s been pulling it 🎯 You just don’t recognize the miracles in life Gary because you have sin in your satan filled heart.

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  2. Gary –

    Of those 16000 kids that starved today, how many did you send food to?

    Lemme see… Of the Top 10 Charities listed by Forbes, three of them are Christian. In the Top 100 are others, like World Vision, Compassion International, Action Against Hunger, Alliance to End Hunger, Salvation Army, Feed the Children, Lifewater, Habitat for Humanity, Childrens Hunger Fund, Samaritans Purse, Food for the Poor… shall I go on?

    These all exist because someone got deluded and thought that “Jesus said so”…

    So, I’m not sure how much Jesus is ignoring anyone. My guess is that there are a lot of people just not taking up the slack….

    I got a good idea you haven’t bough a burger for a homeless guy recently. I have. But I did it cause “Jesus said so”…

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    1. @ ft
      Gary’s point was, if your god could feed the 2 million plus Israelites during their supposed sojourn in the desert why could he not feed a few thousands starving kids from time to time?

      Liked by 4 people

    2. If there were a god who cared, who listened to the prayers of the starving children, he could just solve the problem in an instant. Or, he could make it so that the charity run by the denomination that was the one true correct religion was able to come in and completely solve the problem that nobody else could, thus demonstrating that they are the one true correct religion. But none of this ever happens. All those charities are human people with human limitations using human resources to solve human problems. Because it’s really clear that a god isn’t going to do anything to fix it. All those religious charities, and yet we still have children dying of hunger.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Exactly.

        Christians will often invent ad hoc excuses for why their loving God allows people to suffer. For instance, if a young person dies in a car accident, some Christians will say, “God allowed him to be killed to bring about a greater good: maybe his death will cause others to be convinced that they need to accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior! His death will prevent others from suffering eternal damnation in Hell.”

        But it is a much harder to explain how the painful deaths of 16,000 starving children, each and every day, year after year, will bring about a “greater good”.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Or, they’re not dead to the lord, which means those he wiped out by divine command weren’t worthy enough to live, yet he’ll hasten their eternal visit to hell because they’re not good enough for heaven neither. I sure hope those 16,000 were baptized in the right church.

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  3. Gary –

    re: “But it is a much harder to explain how the painful deaths of 16,000 starving children, each and every day, year after year, will bring about a “greater good”.”

    Yeh, I never use the “greater good” argument.

    The fact is, “the poor will be with us ALWAYS”. There’s never going to come a time when there are just no starving children in the world. Even now, the biggest reasons there are starving children have to do with war, corruption, or very often, simply logistics.

    My guess is, of course, you’re wondering why there has been no “magic solution”, and like one of the other guys on this blog, wondering why God doesn’t just send manna from heaven or something.

    For Christians though, the general belief is that we – believers – are the “body of Christ”. We’re supposed to be doing, on earth, the things that Jesus would do (which includes feeding the hungry). That – as opposed to “miracles” (generally speaking) – is the way that Jesus works in the world these days.

    Granted, you want to see “miracles”, and you feel like, because there are people (children or not – and no, children aren’t more valuable than adults) that are starving, that somehow this supposedly “proves” something about God. Yet, if Jesus was indeed “God With Us”, then this God said “the poor will be with us always”.

    And, of course, it only makes sense. There’s always going to be corrupt goverments that don’t care for their people, and wars (national, tribal, whatever), and so on, because, well, that’s what people do. If you hadn’t noticed, God doesn’t just come down out of heaven and turn everybody into someone as nice and wonderful as you are. And, darn it, I sure don’t know why not.

    But, if starving children trouble you, then do something about it. Your complaints against a God who clearly doesn’t act like you think he should act are no excuse for you not to be contributing.

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    1. You are missing the point entirely, ft.

      The fact that 16,000 children starve to death each and every day is yet more evidence that your god is non-existent. There may be a creator God, but he (she. they. or it) either enjoys massive human and animal suffering or couldn’t care less about it. Your god is a figment of your imagination.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Gary –

    I don’t know what it’s evidence of. You might think that the fact that there is more than enough food in the world right now to feed every single living person (according to the WHO) is evidence that God has really blessed agriculture.

    You can make-up these interpretations all day long, and somebody else can come up with something else to counter it.

    Right now, WHO estimates there is a total of about 10.8% of the worlds population that is undernourished – meaning – not getting more than 1800 calories a day. (No, this 10.8% is not “starving” – they are malnourished). The “16000 children a day” you report are children that have died from starvation-related problems, which can include any number of diseases and infections. And, given that there are 360,000 births a day, that is about 4% that die of starvation-related causes.

    Sill, WHO reports there’s more than enough food to feed everyone in the world. So, lack of food isn’t problem.

    Corruption, conflict, regional weather-related events and regional economic events, and just simply the ability to meet all the logistics of getting food where it’s needed are the bigger issues.

    But, show me someplace in the bible where God – whatever He may be like – every made any kind of promise to make sure nobody gets sick, or hungry, or injured, or dies. I don’t see any such claim ever made by God to “the whole world”. In fact, I don’t see such a claim or promise made to Jews or Christians. What I see is a story that says that after The Fall – Man’s expulsion from “The Garden” – Man would have labor, sickness, and death. And, as I look around the world, that’s pretty much what I see.

    I think it’s far more likely that Man’s “fallen condition” prohibits God, in some fashion, from being the Cosmic Magician you think he should be. But, that’s just a guess. I’d have to think about it.

    Meanwhile, the fact that there is more food than necessary in order to feed every person on the face of the earth seems to tell me that God’s not prohibiting anybody from eating. That’s being cause by somebody else – namely, us….

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      1. No need to put Man in quotes – it’s understood that a capitalized Man, in this context, is understood to refer to Mankind.

        You ask “why” Man has a fallen condition, but I’m not sure what you mean. Could you clarify the question?

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        1. I think it’s far more likely that Man’s “fallen condition” prohibits God, in some fashion…

          Your statement.

          Why does “Man” have a fallen condition?

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  5. Like I said, I don’t understand your question.

    “Why” does Man have a fallen condition? Do you mean, ummm, “what motivated him to acquire such a condition”? Or perhaps, do you mean “in what manner is Man’s condition ‘fallen'”? Or do you mean, “in the Great Cosmic Scheme of Things, why is man ‘fallen’ and not ‘ascendent'”?

    BTW – I’m aware that I made that statement. That knowledge, however, does not clarify your question.

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      1. I use the term “The Fall” – referring, of course, to a “fallen condition of Man” – simply because I know you are well aware of the term itself.

        How did Man acquire this “condition”? There was a time when Man did not exist. The creature that would become Man was not fundamentally different than, say, the higher mammals. And, in this respect, this pre-Man was, like the animals, “innocent”, having no real concept of “good and evil”. The lion kills the antelope, and is not judged, nor does it judge itself. It just does what it does. If there is anything like “conscious thought” to the process at all, it’s not about what’s “good” or “evil”, but about what’s needed at the moment, as per basic drives, such as survival of the species. I doubt, though, that for most (if any) of the higher mammals, there is really any conscious thought at all, or, at least, nothing that comes anywhere close to what Man is capable of.

        But, the creature now called Man did come into existence, and one of the distinguishing differences between Man and animals is that Man developed into a creature capable of Reason – the ability to reach Truths through inferences, such as “two things equal to another thing are equal to each other”, or “a thing is equal to itself”. This ability, plus Free Will – agency to act independently of what might be a deterministic universe – would seem to be the characteristics that differentiate Man from the rest of the animal kingdom.

        Then Man learns a concept, perhaps via Reason – the concept of “Good And Evil”. Not the
        concept of “good”, and the concept of “evil”, mind you, but rather, the paradigm of “Good And Evil”. This was a different thing altogether. Whereas, before this time, Man might watch the lion kill the antelope, and just see that “it is what it is”. But now, with this concept of “Good and Evil”, Man judges. He might now watch that lion and think “Nature is cruel“, whereas, before, there would be no such thought. “Nature is cruel, and if there is a Creator, He too must be cruel“. Mans judgement – of himself, of others, of Nature, and ultimately of God the Creator – and the subsequent loss of the non-judgemental innocence that he had once had (as do the other animals) – came about once Man had learned this concept of “Good And Evil”.

        From the moment Man learned that concept, everything Man related to was going to have an element of “judging” included. Mans relations to other people would be subject to judgement, based on this concept of Good And Evil. Mans assessments or observations of the “happenings” of Nature, and even of Nature herself, would be subject to this same judgement. And, clearly, Man’s assessments of God the Creator would be subject to such judgements. And, of course, the problem is this: While man had foundered upon this grand “concept” of “Good and Evil”, he had absolutely no way to know what thing was really Good, and what thing was really Evil. All things became subject to Mans judgement, including Man himself, and yet, the whole “scale” of “possible judgements” was like an endless line from which you could simply choose any given point and claim that point as “good” or “evil”. And the whole notion is a mess. So much so, that the ancient Hebrew texts say that God told that First Man, “don’t acquire the knowledge of this ‘Good And Evil’ thing – it will eat your lunch”. In fact, according to that ancient text, God told the First Man “if you go and learn about this ‘Good And Evil’ concept, you will surely ‘die a death’ in that day”.

        Now, I’m saying all this to get to this point: THIS is the problem. It’s not about “sin”, it’s not about “getting to heaven”. The problem is that Man’s relation to himself, to other men, to Nature, and to God Himself all got totally screwed up once Man acquired knowledge of the concept of “Good And Evil”. We would no longer be creatures that had the freedom, as do the animals, to simply “do what we do”; rather, we were sentenced to forever make judgements about ourselves, our actions, other people and their actions, and the very nature of Nature and of God, trying to determine – for totally unknown reasons – what is “good” and what is “evil” (as if we could figure that out). The lion kills the antelope, and does not judge itself. The female spider kills it’s mate, and does not feel guilty. They do what they have to do in order to survive, and in order for their species to survive, and are subject to judgement neither of themselves nor of other creatures. For them, “it is what it is”. For humans, with the advent of the concept of “Good And Evil”, life can become a hellhole, full of judgements, ill feelings, ideas of “this or that person is bad”, OR, equally as screwed up, judging someone else to be of higher stature, more vaunted, “better than…”. Either way is equally screwed up.

        This, then, is what I refer to as “fallen Man” – and, exactly how Man acquired this hellish notion of “Good and Evil” – the exact “mechanism” by what it happened – is beyond me. Ancient Hebrew tales say it had to do with Man “eating of the fruit of the tree of Knowledge of ‘Good and Evil'”, but does not expound on what that means. But, whatever the specific “mechanism” was, the point remains that we became – by some acquired knowledge (which is beyond that which is instinctive) – judgemental creatures, having an idea of “Good and Evil” yet not knowing what is truly Good and what is truly Evil. It is this creature that Man became that I refer to as “fallen Man”.

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        1. Did God know that Man would one day acquire this ability to know Good from Evil when God made Man’s original primordial ancestor or made the original matter that would one day evolve into Man?

          Liked by 1 person

  6. I never once said that Man has an “ability to know Good from Evil”. In fact, I said quite the opposite.

    I said that Man became a creature that had “… an idea of “Good and Evil” yet not knowing what is truly Good and what is truly Evil. You’ll note that I put “Good and Evil” in single-quotes. This is referring to the concept of “Good and Evil”. This is far different from knowing what is Good and what is Evil.

    I even expounded on this very point, saying “Man acquired knowledge of the concept of “Good And Evil”. We would no longer be creatures that had the freedom, as do the animals, to simply “do what we do”; rather, we were sentenced to forever make judgements about ourselves, our actions, other people and their actions, and the very nature of Nature and of God, trying to determine – for totally unknown reasons – what is “good” and what is “evil” (as if we could figure that out). ”

    So, since I never once contended that Man has an “ability to know Good from Evil”, then I don’t understand why you are asking me if God knew “that Man would one day acquire this ability to know Good from Evil”.

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    1. Did God know when he created our primordial ancestor (or the matter that would eventually become our primordial ancestor) that at some point in time “Man would acquire knowledge of the concept of “Good And Evil” “?

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  7. I’m certain He knows what He’s going to do, and what things He Himself is going to bring about. If there’s an end to the Universe, I’m certain He knows when that will happen. There are probably all kinds of things about the future that God knows, and that we cannot possibly know.

    I suspect He knew that you were going to ask that question even before you knew you were going to, because if science is right, and decisions are made in our subconscious before we “make the decision” in our conscious mind, then I suspect that God knew the decision of your subconscious mind before your conscious mind knew about it.

    But, I really cannot fathom why you’re asking me if “God does not know what will happen in the future”. That amazes me that you should even ask. Heck, you already know things that are going to happen in your own future. You know you’re going to die. You know the sun will come up tomorrow. You know cells in your body are going to die off and get replaced, up until you’re dead. You know that for the rest of your life, you’ll always be able to look up and find the Big Dipper. There’s no telling how much YOU know about your own future. So, asking if “God does not know what will happen in the future” seems like an incredibly silly question.

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    1. So your God DOES know what will happen in the future! All this hemming and hawing has been for nothing.

      Your God created a universe knowing full well that billions of human beings and animals would endure MASSIVE suffering for tens of thousands of years, including the fact that 16,000 children would starve to death each and every day, yet he went ahead and created the universe anyway.

      Why????

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Gary –

    I already told you –

    Gary: “Did God know when he created our primordial ancestor (or the matter that would eventually become our primordial ancestor) that at some point in time “Man would acquire knowledge of the concept of “Good And Evil” “?”

    Me: “I don’t think so”

    Gary: “So your God is not all-knowing (omniscient)?”

    Me: “I believe God knows all that is possible to know at any given time.”

    So how, in God’s name, you have concluded “Your God created a universe knowing full well that billions of human beings and animals would endure MASSIVE suffering for tens of thousands of years, including the fact that 16,000 children would starve to death each and every day, yet he went ahead and created the universe anyway.” is far, far beyond me.

    I do realize that the position you stated is, of course, the only position you’re prepared to argue, but, it’s not MY position.

    I have no commitment whatsoever that God knew ” full well that billions of human beings and animals would endure MASSIVE suffering for tens of thousands of years, including the fact that 16,000 children would starve to death each and every day”

    Why don’t you argue with something I’ve SAID, rather than arguing with yourself over stuff YOU’VE said?

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    1. I’m certain He knows what He’s going to do, and what things He Himself is going to bring about. If there’s an end to the Universe, I’m certain He knows when that will happen. There are probably all kinds of things about the future that God knows, and that we cannot possibly know.

      Yea. Your god knew when the world will end but he did not know that the living creatures resulting from his creation would endure MASSIVE suffering.

      What a nonsensical, made-up belief system.

      Your theology is nothing more than Smorgasbord theology: You pick out the parts of traditional Christian theology that you like, reject what you don’t like, and replace it with your own inventions. It is total BS. I don’t know why I bother talking to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Gary – use your head.

    The REASON God would know when the end of the universe is, is because He Himself will bring it about, when He creates the “New Heavens and New Earth”.

    As I indicated very clearly, God certainly knows what He Himself will do in the future.

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        1. But that is what people living their lives governed by superstitions need to hear, blunt and unequivocally: You are deluded! Wake the hell up! There is no need whatsoever to engage in debates or detailed discussions with the deluded.

          My conversations with you over the last year or so are proof positive.

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  10. BTW – re: “You pick out the parts of traditional Christian theology that you like, reject what you don’t like, and replace it with your own inventions.”

    First, you already KNOW there are parts of what you call “traditional Christian theology’ that simply don’t work. Why should i not reject those parts?

    Second, you credit me be being far too “inventive”. I’m hardly the inventor of the theological thought that God doesn’t know “all things about the future”. It doesn’t take too much googling to figure out that the question of “omniscience” is still debated today, and that there is no clear statement or support for the idea that “God knows all things about the future” found in the bible.

    You reject “traditional Christian theology” (as well you should). So do I. But, I do not reject “Jesus, resurrected”, nor do I reject “God, in general”, as you do.

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  11. You could be absolutely right. If Jesus were not resurrected, then, it’s utterly pointless to bother with anything about “Christianity” (and, IMHO, with the whole “God topic”).

    Thing is, I’m convinced that Jesus was, in fact, resurrected.

    Is that “subject to change”? Absolutely. Dang, if somebody came up with some archaeological find – like, some kind of document – that clearly showed that Jesus’ body was never even taken from the cross (for example) – OR – anything else that would show that his burial and resurrection was simply NOT a possibility. then I’d drop “Christianity” like a hot potato.

    You hold to the idea that “miracles are not possible”. I do not. The reason I do not consider “miracles” (ie, “God working in the natural realm”) is because I do not consider the idea that the Universe was created by a Being as “irrational”. There are only two choices, after all: Either the Universe was created by a “thing” – a “natural working of a natural process” – OR – it was created by a Being.

    There is absolutely NO scientific evidence of how the Universe was created. None. There is no data whatsoever from before the Big Bang.

    So, either view is both equally rational, or, equally irrational.

    But, if the Universe was indeed created by a Being, rather than by a “thing”, then that creation itself is the very definition of “miraculous”. And, for all I know, there may have been only two miracles ever done: Creation, and the resurrection of Jesus (which is the beginning of the re-Creation of the Universe).

    So, I don’t automatically presume that the miraculous is impossible. Nor do I. presume that it’s ever actually happened. Rather, I am currently convinced that Jesus was indeed resurrected, and it is that that convinces me that the miraculous is a real possibility.

    Can I be convinced otherwise? Sure, absolutely. So, if somebody comes along and convinces me that Jesus was not factually, historically resurrected, then, I might start my own “Don’t Believe This Crap” blog myself…

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