How to Know for Sure if Jesus Lives in Your Heart

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Christians, evangelical Christians in particular, believe that an invisible being resides within their bodies; he speaks to them internally in an inaudible voice; he provides guidance in their day to day decisions; he provides them with tremendous comfort and security like no earthly friend can. This being’s name is Jesus.

This belief is very, very entrenched in the psyche of these believers, but it is a belief that I believe is a delusion.

And as long as Christians believe that their invisible friend with supernatural powers lives inside their bodies, no amount of natural evidence is going to convince them that the Resurrection of Jesus did not happen; that their friend has been dead for two thousand years.

The same is true for a child who has an imaginary friend.
 
So how do we help Christians see that their invisible friend does not exist? Answer: The same way we prove to a child that HIS imaginary friend does not exist.
 
If you ask a child to ask his (imaginary) friend “Tommy” to prove to YOU his existence, the child will probably tell you that “Tommy” won’t appear to you because you don’t believe in him or some other similar excuse. But ask the child to do this: Tell the child to ask “Tommy”, when he is alone, to prove to HIM that he (Tommy) exists. Ask “Tommy” to do something that is magical (supernatural). Ask “Tommy” to lift something off of the ground, keep it hanging in space for a minute, then slowly lower it back down to the floor. If “Tommy” does that, then he is real. If “Tommy” doesn’t do that, then “Tommy” is not real. He is just your imagination, and if he is just your imagination, you don’t need him.

I challenge every Christian to do the same.

You may believe that Jesus speaks to you, performs miracles for you, and that you can feel his presence within you, but I believe that your experiences with “Jesus” are no different than the above child’s experiences with “Tommy”. Ask “Jesus” to prove his existence. Ask “Jesus” to perform a true miracle (supernatural act) than cannot be a rare, natural, random event. Don’t ask “Jesus” to cure Aunt Bessie’s sinus infection. Ask “Jesus” to levitate a lamp. Just for thirty seconds.

If “Jesus” refuses to levitate the lamp. He is not real. He is only your imagination. The voice you hear is YOU. The presence you feel is YOU. The “miracles” you have experienced are nothing other than rare but very natural, random events.

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Now, we all know that telling Christians to test the reality of Jesus’ presence “in their heart” by asking him to levitate a lamp is not going to convince most of them that Jesus is not real. How are we going to respond to their many excuses?

“Jesus doesn’t like to be tested.”

So how do we handle this excuse? I suggest that we handle it as we would handle a child and his imaginary friend who also does not like being tested.

“Ok. But explain to “Tommy” how important it is to you to know for sure that he exists. Not being sure if he exists causes you a lot of anxiety and stress. If “Tommy” really cares about you he will prove he exists by doing a magical act just for you.”

“But Tommy wants me to believe in him without magic tricks.”

Well, without doing a magic trick, you will never be sure that “Tommy” is not just your own imagination; that you are simply talking to yourself. So again, if “Tommy” really cares about you, he will prove that he exists.

“Tommy says not to listen to you; that if I stop believing in him and doing what he says, he will torture me in a dark pit!”

“Tell “Tommy” that if he doesn’t raise/levitate the damn lamp, then he is not real, and if he is not real, he cannot hurt you!”

Etc…

Invisible beings are not real.

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26 thoughts on “How to Know for Sure if Jesus Lives in Your Heart

  1. Oh brother…weird. Well, our imaginary friends are at our beck and call aren't they. You just don't get it, you are so off. You have talked yourself into whatever you believe which is mainly copy and paste. I know you don't exist because you cant do anything I ask. Well, actually I wouldn't bother asking you…I wont finish this comment. I don't really care. I don't know you (thankfully)

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  2. Yes, it is hard to accept that talking to your invisible god is no different than a child talking to his imaginary friend, but that is what the evidence indicates.

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  3. What evidence are you referring to? Do you have evidence that an imaginary friend is really imaginary? The more you post the less intelligent you sound.

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  4. Is it possible that an invisible Jesus lives within the hearts of Christians? Yes.

    Is it possible that some children really do have invisible friends? Yes.

    Is it possible that an invisible Boogeyman sleeps under my bed? Yes.

    Is it possible that invisible goblins inhabit the forests? Yes.

    All these invisible beings are possible, but are they probable? No! They are not probable because there is no good evidence which supports the claim that they do exist.
    Just as modern, educated people should no longer fear ghosts, goblins, and the Boogeyman, we should not fear ancient invisible deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, and Yahweh.

    The evidence indicates that these beings are superstitions; they are imaginary, not real. We no longer need to fear the scare tactics of the followers of these non-existent invisible beings.

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  5. Dear Readers: This anonymous (fundamentalist Christian?) commenter is engaging in very common cult behavior: repeated attempts to destroy the credibility of the ex-cult member (me) while not addressing the criticisms that the ex-cult member has expressed.

    Here is what one expert on the cults says about this issue: “The stories of abuse, betrayal, harassment, intimidation, fear, broken families, neglected children, financial ruin, and personal and emotional devastation that I¹ve heard from so many ex-members over the years impels and inspires me in that struggle. I believe one of the most effective strategies to counter the disinformation and slander (of the cults against their ex-members)is to help ex-members tell their story…”

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  6. “This anonymous (fundamentalist Christian?) commenter is engaging in very common cult behavior: repeated attempts to destroy the credibility of the ex-cult member” You are so self centered Gary. I don't need to try to destroy your credibility. You do it to yourself all the time. And yes, lamps levitate but Jesus doesn't do it.

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  7. Why should we? My final comment on this is that if you know Jesus, you KNOW. There is no doubt. If I had not experienced God in this way I wouldn't have believed it either. But I have and I KNOW. It is NOT emotion (I have told you this several times before but will repeat it as you seem to have a tough time grasping that fact) but it is a real thing.

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  8. Until I and other ex-Christians are able to help Christians like you see that the voice in your head is none other than yourself, and, that the few “miracles” you have experienced were merely rare, random, but very natural coincidences, I doubt that ANY evidence is going to change your mind, friend.

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  9. I would bet that even if we found the bones of Jesus and could somehow verify with 99.999% accuracy that the bones in question were his by DNA testing, believers such as yourself would refuse to accept this evidence because the Voice that speaks to you in your head and the few rare coincidences that you believe were miracles are stronger proof, to you, of the Resurrection than ANY other evidence.

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  10. Here is a question for you, Anon:

    When looking at the “miracles” which you believe you have experienced are there any of them that could not have been very rare but natural events/coincidences?

    For instance, I have a relative who suffered for months with “bone on bone” arthritis pain in the knee. He prayed to Jesus about his knee and the pain “disappeared”. Is it possible that a supernatural being such as Jesus healed my cousin's arthritic knee? Sure. But is it also possible that my cousin's recovery from pain was merely a rare, random coincidence? Yes.

    It isn't as if my cousin is an amputee of his entire left leg and after prayer to Jesus, his severed limb was instantaneously reattached. That could NOT be a rare, but natural coincidence.

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  11. Another Christian uses the following story as his proof of the existence of Lord Jesus:

    One day “God” led him to call a friend whom he had not spoken to for quite some time. When he called the friend, he told him that “God” had moved him to call him and to tell him that he (the friend) should go visit his father right away.

    The friend went that weekend to see his father whom he had not seen for quite some time. His father told him he had incurable cancer and died a few days later.

    -Could this “messaging” have been a miracle/act of God? Yes.
    -Could this have been a very rare, very odd, but very random coincidence? Yes.

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  12. Why do “miracles” always involve events for which a natural explanation is possible, even if it is a very unlikely, rare, natural explanation? Why doesn’t Lord Jesus ever reattach the limbs (arms or legs) of amputees? Why doesn’t Lord Jesus ever raise decapitees (people who have been beheaded) from the dead? Why doesn’t Lord Jesus ever raise from the dead, people who have blown into a thousand tiny pieces by a bomb or airplane accident?

    What does Lord Jesus have against amputees, decapitees, bombing, and airplane crash victims? Why does he NEVER heal/resurrect these people?

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  13. Wow! I can't resist all these comments you posted. I am not relying on miracles as I haven't had any like you posted about. I just KNOW. I have not looked for physical proof, emotional proof, miraculous proof or heard voices…I just KNOW God is there. I can not explain it but that is what it is.

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  14. Believing that you know the truth but not knowing why it is the truth is not very good evidence that your position IS the truth, friend. I doubt you would buy this argument from anyone else regarding any other aspect of life.

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  15. To expand further on my comment about my cousin's “healed” knee, read this:

    Earlier this week I was discussing my current status as a “non-believer” with one of my Christian cousins. I pointed out to him some of the many errors in the Bible. He didn’t care.

    “Look, Gary. I know that Jesus is real because he healed me of my “bone on bone”, very painful arthritis in my knee. I could barely walk on it. I prayed to Jesus and he healed me. I no longer have pain.”

    I tried to suggest that his “cure” was a rare coincidence, but he would have none of it. In his mind, Jesus had healed him, so all the evidence against the Bible wouldn’t matter to him. Jesus had made himself personally real. That was all the evidence he needed.

    Here is what I should have said to my cousin:

    “Dear Cousin, on the day that Jesus allegedly healed your arthritic knee, 20,000 people died of cancer, 21,000 people died of starvation (most of them little children), and every two minutes on that day, a woman or child was raped. Jesus did nothing to prevent these horrific tragedies, but he found the time to cure your painful knee.

    Seriously??”

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  16. I have commented on your site several times before and told you why I believe what I do and how God has shown himself to me. All you do is argue and want hard proof like real weird miracles, Jesus bones or whatever, proof of the Red Sea crossing etc etc. God has shown me he is real and I can only say I know He is.

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  17. Well, you may BELIEVE that Jesus is alive and dwelling within your body but you cannot KNOW without evidence.

    But unless you are willing to provide evidence, we will be forced to assume that your belief is based on feelings and perceptions and not evidence.

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  18. Yes. Well I know that leprechauns exist. I can't provide any evidence that they exist but I know they do. You will just have to take my word on it.

    Don't believe me?

    Assume what you want.

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