You do not need to be a Scholar to Disbelieve the Resurrection

Joseph Smith, Moroni, and the Golden Plates

Two thousand years ago, hundreds of millions of people on earth believed in a god named Zeus who lived on top of Mount Olympus in Greece who performed many fantastical supernatural deeds.  The existence of Zeus and the historicity of his alleged deeds have never been disproven.

Approximately 1300 years ago, a man named Mohammad claimed to have received a visit from a supernatural being who gave him the true word of the creator of the universe and who enabled him to fly on a winged horse into the heavens.  Hundreds of millions of people today believe in the historicity of these claims.  These claims have never been disproven.

Approximately 200 years ago, a man named Joseph Smith claimed to have received golden plates from a supernatural being containing the true, updated, word of the creator of the universe.  Millions of people today believe that this claim is historical fact.  This claim has never been disproven.

Since these claims have never been disproven, should we believe them?  Should we believe these fantastical, extra-ordinary claims that defy the established laws of nature?  The proponents of the above claims would say that the possible/probable existence of a Creator greatly increases the probability of these claims being true.  But is that really correct?  Doesn’t the evidence seem to suggest that if a Creator exists, he/she/they/it have chosen to operate, at least within our universe, within the natural laws? How often have experts confirmed that established natural laws have been violated?

I would therefore suggest that the possible existence of a Creator can in no way be assumed to increase the probability of un-natural events occurring within our universe.  We have no confirmed evidence to suggest that a Creator routinely or even sporadically violates the laws of nature.  We have no evidence to believe that gods live on Greek mountains; that celestial beings enable humans to ride on winged horses; or that persons in upstate New York receive plates of gold from angels.

So when another large group of people living today tells you their fantastical, extra-ordinary claim that two thousand years ago a three-day-dead corpse was suddenly reanimated back to life by an ancient middle-eastern deity, broke out of his sealed tomb, ate a fish lunch with his former fishing buddies, and then levitated into the clouds, I suggest that we consider this claim to be just as probable as the three claims above.

And unlike what you have been told, dear friend, you do NOT need to be a scholar to disbelieve all four of these supernatural claims.  Why?  Answer:  Because the onus of proof is NOT on you, the skeptic.  In western, educated society the onus is always on the person making the fantastical, extra-ordinary claim, not on those who doubt it.

Therefore, the onus is on the proponents of these four supernatural tales to prove their veracity, and so far, the evidence presented by these groups of believers is dismal to pathetic.  That is why no public university history textbook in the western world lists any of these four claims as even “probable” historical events.

You don’t need to be a scholar to disbelieve supernatural religious tales of gods living on mountains, prophets flying in the air on winged horses, upstate New Yorkers receiving heavenly messages in cow pastures, or reanimated dead guys flying off into outer space. Don’t let the proponents of these tall tales convince you otherwise.

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