The Lack of Evidence for the Exodus proves the Resurrection Claim is False


The entire Egyptian army drowns in the Sea
chasing after their runaway Hebrew slaves

One of the key pieces of evidence for me in my deconversion from Christianity was the discovery that there is zero evidence for the Hebrew Slavery in Egypt, the Exodus, or the Forty Years of Wandering in the Sinai.  None.  Nor is there any evidence of the great Egyptian defeat at the hands of their fleeing slaves.  None.

Christians will often argue that the Egyptians did not erect monuments to their defeats, and that this is why there is no mention in Egypt of this Egyptian disaster.  This may be true, but what about the surrounding nations?  Egypt was the most powerful nation on earth at that time.  Are we really to believe that the God of the Hebrews drowned the entire Egyptian army in a sea while in hot pursuit of their runaway slaves…and no one in the ancient world thought it was of enough significance to record it??

At this point, Christians will sometimes say:  “Well, it wasn’t the entire Egyptian army.  It was just his charioteers” or “It was just one of many Egyptians armies, so it wasn’t that news worthy”.  Let’s see what the Bible says:

Then the Lord said to Moses: Tell the Israelites to turn back and camp in front of Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, in front of Baal-zephon; you shall camp opposite it, by the sea. Pharaoh will say of the Israelites, “They are wandering aimlessly in the land; the wilderness has closed in on them.” I will harden Pharaoh’s heart, and he will pursue them, so that I will gain glory for myself over Pharaoh and all his army; and the Egyptians shall know that I am the Lord. And they did so.

When the king of Egypt was told that the people had fled, the minds of Pharaoh and his officials were changed toward the people, and they said, “What have we done, letting Israel leave our service?” So he had his chariot made ready, and took his army with him; he took six hundred picked chariots and all the other chariots of Egypt with officers over all of them. The Lord hardened the heart of Pharaoh king of Egypt and he pursued the Israelites, who were going out boldly. 9 The Egyptians pursued them, all Pharaoh’s horses and chariots, his chariot drivers and his army; they overtook them camped by the sea, by Pi-hahiroth, in front of Baal-zephon.

 Then the Lord said to Moses, “Stretch out your hand over the sea, so that the water may come back upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots and chariot drivers.” 27 So Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and at dawn the sea returned to its normal depth. As the Egyptians fled before it, the Lord tossed the Egyptians into the sea. 28 The waters returned and covered the chariots and the chariot drivers, the entire army of Pharaoh that had followed them into the sea; not one of them remained. 29 But the Israelites walked on dry ground through the sea, the waters forming a wall for them on their right and on their left.

GarySo unless you are Bill Clinton, “all” and “entire” mean exactly what the dictionary says they mean:  all Pharaoh’s army; the entire Egyptian army; was drowned in the sea.  Christians can try to wiggle out of this dilemma by pulling a “Bill Clinton”, claiming that words don’t really mean what we all know they mean, but the facts are clear:  The Holy Bible claims that the entire mighty Egyptian army drowned in the sea chasing after their runaway slaves…

…but no one in the entire world bothered to document the greatest Egyptian defeat in history! 

Conclusion:  The absence of evidence does not prove the evidence of absence. But, the absence of evidence for a couple million people allegedly exiting Egypt in one great exodus to wander around the small geographical area of the Sinai for forty years…but not leave one shred of archeological evidence, nor any mention of their shocking, miraculous defeat of the mighty Egyptian Pharaoh and his entire army in the annals of any nation on earth, is strong evidence that this story is nothing more than a nationalistic, ancient Hebrew fable.

Why does this matter, folks?  Here’s why:

If there was no Exodus, there was no Passover.  And if there was no Passover, then Jesus could not have been the Passover Lamb.  Jesus could not have been the fulfillment of an event which never happened.  And if Jesus believed that he was the fulfillment of an event which never happened, it means that Jesus made a mistake.  And if Jesus made a mistake, he wasn’t perfect and all-knowing.  And if Jesus wasn’t perfect and all-knowing, then he wasn’t God, as Christians claim.  And if Jesus wasn’t God, there is no reason to worship him, and, the chances that his resurrection story is just another Hebrew legend is very, very high.

The Exodus is a fable.  Christianity is based on fables and legends. 

Christianity is false.

Moderate Christian from Theology Web:

Quote Originally Posted by Gary
        

“One of the key pieces of evidence for me in my deconversion from Christianity was the discovery that there is zero evidence for the Hebrew Slavery in Egypt, the Exodus, or the Forty Years of Wandering in the Sinai. None. Nor is there any evidence of the great Egyptian defeat at the hands of their fleeing slaves. None.

Christians will often argue that the Egyptians did not erect monuments to their defeats, and that this is why there is no mention in Egypt of this Egyptian disaster. This may be true, but what about the surrounding nations? Egypt was the most powerful nation on earth at that time. Are we really to believe that the God of the Hebrews drowned the entire Egyptian army in a sea while in hot pursuit of their runaway slaves…and no one in the ancient world thought it was of enough significance to record it??

At this point, Christians will sometimes say: “Well, it wasn’t the entire Egyptian army. It was just his charioteers” or “It was just one of many Egyptians armies, so it wasn’t that news worthy”. Let’s see what the Bible says.”

 

Quite – let’s see what the Bible has to say about it, and ignore interpretations based on expections – whether the expectations of atheists or theists (of whatever stamp).

Then the Lord said to Moses: 2 Tell the Israelites to turn back and camp in front of Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, in front of Baal-zephon; you shall camp opposite it, by the sea. 3 Pharaoh will say of the Israelites, “They are wandering aimlessly in the land; the wilderness has closed in on them.” 4 I will harden Pharaoh’s heart, and he will pursue them, so that I will gain glory for myself over Pharaoh and all his army; and the Egyptians shall know that I am the Lord. And they did so.
5 When the king of Egypt was told that the people had fled, the minds of Pharaoh and his officials were changed toward the people, and they said, “What have we done, letting Israel leave our service?”
    

There is some time elapsed between the departure of the Israelites and the decision to pursue. Will Pharaoh recall his entire army from every point in Egypt and every hotspot in the land and among allies to give pursuit? Will he simply assemble the nearest and fastest available troops to give pursuit, or assign foot-soldiers (by far the most numerous complement of his army) to travel with his chariots? True, this does go to expectation, but a certain amount of logic needs to be exercised. Remembering that it will take no less than a full day to muster even a smallish complement of six hundred troops and a lot longer to muster and equip a full army of horse and foot, how long would it take for soldiers on foot to close with a quarry that has a significant head start?

6 So he had his chariot made ready, and took his army with him; 7 he took six hundred picked chariots and all the other chariots of Egypt with officers over all of them. 8 The Lord hardened the heart of Pharaoh king of Egypt and he pursued the Israelites, who were going out boldly. 9 The Egyptians pursued them, all Pharaoh’s horses and chariots, his chariot drivers and his army; they overtook them camped by the sea, by Pi-hahiroth, in front of Baal-zephon.
    

Six hundred picked chariots – or, chosen chariots – with captains over each. The “republican guard” so to speak, or the “king’s own”. The six hundred are Pharaoh’s troops. the “and” of “and all the chariots”, bolded, isn’t in the original text, nor is “other”. Again the question needs to be asked – “Did Pharaoh recall every chariot from every far flung corner of Egypt and beyond before he took up pursuit? How long would it take to send messengers to the troops concerned, and recall not only his chariots but his every foot soldier?

… Then the Lord said to Moses, “Stretch out your hand over the sea, so that the water may come back upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots and chariot drivers.” 
    

?? What about all the foot soldiers? Why wasn’t the sea expected to close over them as well?

27 So Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and at dawn the sea returned to its normal depth. As the Egyptians fled before it, the Lord tossed the Egyptians into the sea. 28 The waters returned and covered the chariots and the chariot drivers, the entire army of Pharaoh that had followed them into the sea; not one of them remained. 29 But the Israelites walked on dry ground through the sea, the waters forming a wall for them on their right and on their left.
     

And here, no extraneous “and” or “other” has been slapped into the translated text. The waters covered – the CHARIOTS and CHARIOT DRIVERS, the entire army that had followed them (the Israelites) into the sea.

Quoting Gary; So unless you are Bill Clinton, “all” and “entire” mean exactly what the dictionary says they mean: all Pharaoh’s army; the entire Egyptian army; was drowned in the sea. Christians can try to wiggle out of this dilemma by pulling a “Bill Clinton”, claiming that words don’t really mean what we all know they mean, but the facts are clear: The Holy Bible claims that the entire mighty Egyptian army drowned in the sea chasing after their runaway slaves… 
    

As is shown, that is nothing like what the Bible says. NOT “the entire army”, but, “the entire army that followed.”

…but no one in the entire world bothered to document the greatest Egyptian defeat in history!

Conclusion: The absence of evidence does not prove the evidence of absence. But, the absence of evidence for a couple million people allegedly exiting Egypt in one great exodus to wander around the small geographical area of the Sinai for forty years…but not leave one shred of archeological evidence, nor any mention of their shocking, miraculous defeat of the mighty Egyptian Pharaoh and his entire army in the annals of any nation on earth, is strong evidence that this story is nothing more than a nationalistic, ancient Hebrew fable.

    

No evidence of anyone being in that region during that time frame exists. Where did the native inhabitants go? Or are the Egyptian records of people living in that area in that time a fabrication?

Having dealt with the matters raised concerning the army of Pharaoh by Gary in his private message, I’ll forego the balance of that private message’s rant about Gary’s opinion (based on some very strange applications of the meaning of “study”) of how false Christianity is.

With all that said though, I would not be surprised to find that the number of Israelites who fled Egypt has been overstated. Archaeological findings from the areas around Israel pre-kingom don’t tend to support the idea that millions of people suddenly entered the region. A few hundred thousand, perhaps even several hundred thousand, but not millions.

Gary:

You could be right.  When the passage talks about “all” Pharaoh’s army and “Pharaoh’s entire army” it could mean what you say: it was only part of the army that chased after the Hebrews, and only part of the army of foot soldiers that followed the chariots drowned.  However, I think one has to really stretch the reading of the text to get to that interpretation.  I believe that if one sits down and reads the entire Book of Exodus, one will walk away with the impression that the entire nation of Egypt and her entire army were brought down to utter defeat and destruction by the God of the Hebrews.  I think that is the entire point of the whole story:  Obey and place your complete trust in Yahweh and Yahweh will bring even the most mighty and powerful of your enemies to his knees in utter desolation.

Why would Pharaoh stop his pursuit of the Hebrews if all he had lost was just a division of charioteers?  I think an unbiased reading of the text clearly indicates that God (or at least the author of the Exodus story) wants his readers to believe that the Hebrew God completely desolated the mighty Egyptians.  Just drowning a few charioteers and a few squadrons of foot soldiers who happened to follow them seems very anti-climatic.

But, yes, you still could be right.

In regards to Pharaoh summoning his entire army from all over the country, think about this:  Who would move at a faster pace to reach the Red Sea (or Reed Sea):  Soldiers in chariots or even soldiers on foot, or, a mass of people with old people, young children, their sick, livestock, tents, cooking utensils, and other supplies with a large percentage of them most likely walking on foot.

And here is something else to consider:  During the time period of the alleged Exodus, Canaan was an occupied territory of Egypt, dotted with Egyptians garrisons and forts.  So fleeing Egypt to escape to Canaan, would be like fleeing Nazi Germany to escape to Nazi-occupied Austria!  It would make no sense whatsoever.

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