The New Testament is a Catholic Document



Men like this chose the canon of the New Testament,
not apostles.

Sola Scriptura! 

Sola Scriptura! 
Sola Scriptura!
 
 
“Sola Scriptura!”  That was the battle cry of the Protestants during the Protestant Reformation.  “Down with Church Tradition!” they would add.  Yet by making “Scripture” the highest authority for Protestant Christianity, the Reformers, in reality, elevated the greatest of all Catholic Church traditions to preeminence in their belief system:  the canon of the New Testament.
 
There is no evidence of a canon of the New Testament by the end of the first century.  This means that the Bible as we know it today has no apostolic authority whatsoever.  Conservative Christians may try to convince us that the fisherman, John, son of Zebedee, sat down by his fishing boat and wrote the stylistic, literary masterpiece of the Gospel of According to John, but most scholars don’t buy it.
 
Other than seven Pauline epistles, we have no idea who wrote the books of the New Testament.  But what we do know is who established the New Testament canon:  devout Catholics.  The same people who were baptizing babies and eating the “real” flesh and blood of a dead Jesus in their “Eucharist”, are the same people who decided which books were in and which books were out of what we today call, “the Holy Bible, the inerrant Word of God”.
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One thought on “The New Testament is a Catholic Document

  1. Gary said: most scholars don't buy it.

    LOL what a scientific statement that is. This is a scientific conclusion? Have you polled all scholars and arrived at a percentage upon which you can scientifically state that “most scholars don't buy it”? Which scholars? Bart Ehrman and Dagwood? What about the scholars who DO “buy it”? Are their credentials questionable because their conclusion differs from yours or the outcome you'd prefer? Science, reason and logic my firm, muscular buttocks.

    Like

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